Dangerous dalliance with populist minor parties

Nick_Xenophon.jpgThe Australian Greens are a disingenuous and hypocritical political party. They continually hold themselves up to be something other than what they are and their actions often betray their words.

Masquerading as the compassionate, progressive voice of the parliament, they have a cavalier dismissal of the thousands of people who drowned at sea as a result of Labor-Greens border protection policies.

Whilst advocating for a ban on coal mining, they struck a preference deal with coal miner Clive Palmer at the 2013 election.

This year, they decided to preference the Christian Democratic Party (CDP) ahead of a Liberal candidate who happens to be an Aboriginal homosexual who supports redefining marriage.

Now there is nothing wrong with preferencing the CDP - if you are a conservative – but how the rainbow alliance of Greens activists can defend that particular decision is beyond me.

But then, I am trapped by trying to approach politics in a principled and consistent manner. Too many others are just like the Greens and seem untroubled by conscience, principle or consistency.

For them, it is the political tribe that matters more than the issue itself. This is a characteristic of the political left and their supporters in the media.

The examples are legion and easily gathered on a daily basis.

A couple of weeks ago, the ‘fair and balanced’ ABC took great delight in broadcasting Tasmania’s erratic Jacqui Lambie stating her desire to inflict violence upon me. Imagine the reaction from the leftists if that boot was on the other foot.

Last night, again on the ABC, we had the pleasure of listening to Nick Xenophon whinge that the major parties were not directing preferences in South Australia at this election. The fact that he does exactly the same thing appears to have been lost on him and the unquestioning ABC reporters.

The cesspool of Twitter is probably the most insightful example of leftist hypocrisy available. It’s like a pile-on of losers attacking truth and conservatism and yet it is used as a research tool by many journalists to justify their story perspective.

Not surprisingly, the groupthink that pervades Twitter and its media echo chamber is completely at odds with where mainstream Australia is at.

And yet, too few politicians and political parties are prepared to stand up to the bullying and intimidation handed out by such social pressure.

To do so actually takes character, strength and personal integrity. It takes logic to argue a case based on values and defend policy built on principle.

However, the benefits of doing so are myriad. The Australian people are desperate for people they can trust in public life. They crave authenticity and integrity from their leaders, even when they might disagree with the sentiments themselves.

And that’s why there is such a strong electoral dalliance with the populist micro and minor parties. It isn’t an endorsement of their ideas but more a lack of faith in the major alternatives and the quest to trust someone.

However, serious analysis of any genuine alternative highlights how cursory any examination of them has been.

Whatever the doubts about Labor and Liberal, no one truly knows what Nick Xenophon, Lambie, Lazarus, the Greens and their ilk actually stand for.

We know they vote together in the Senate more than with anyone else but as to core, governing principles, they remain a blank but populist slate.

I regret that our nation can’t afford to be subject to such flights of fancy any longer. It’s costing us and our children billions of borrowed dollars every year.

Now, that might not bother those who only care for today, but it sure as heck worries those of us who are concerned about the future.

With only a couple of weeks to go before the next election, I’ll be doing my best to hold my end up.

If you’d like to help out, you can still do so here.