Growing unrest in the Australian majority

reclaim_aus.jpgI am out and about in regional South Australia this week, so the comment will be mercifully brief!

It is clear from my conversations with constituents that they are worried about the direction of the country. There is a sense of frustration that their politicians are letting them down.

Many have been very critical of the Senate and the inability of the government to get its agenda through. Whilst the blame is mostly afforded to the independents, a growing number are realising that Labor is the greatest roadblock to reform.

Whilst there doesn't seem to be much love for any political leader, Bill Shorten is increasingly seen as a 'hollow man' who 'stands for nothing' and is 'untrustworthy'.

In fact, many of those I have met on this road trip have been very free with their withering character assessment of Bill Shorten and what he represents to the modern Labor movement.

I have pointed out on many occasions that, under Shorten's leadership, Labor are now even opposing measures that they promised to implement when in government!

A few months ago, the conversation was somewhat reversed. Shorten didn't feature at all while many despaired about the somewhat inconsistent approach taken by the current government. That now seems to have changed.

My assessment is that the government is beginning to reflect the concerns that feature in the lives of many Australians. There is still a long way to go and I feel like a broken record in repeating them, but perhaps the message is starting to get through.

People are worried about our way of life, the cost of living, keeping their jobs and what sort of a country will we be leaving our children.

Some are quite incensed about matters, which was shown by last week’s 'Reclaim Australia' rallies by people concerned about the advancement of Islam in Australia.

The rallies were marked by the standard rent-a-crowd opposition claiming 'racism' but who fail to understand that Islam is an ideology, not a race. These same clowns had little to say when Islamists hold their violent protests calling for the beheading of infidels.

Much of the media joined in the 'racist' claim chorus. I suspect because it's so much easier than actually having to explain the facts. After all, that would mean actually understanding the subject matter one is reporting on!

Some years ago, whilst been crucified by media and politicians for meeting Dutch MP Geert Wilders as I was examining social unrest in Europe, I warned that unless government addressed divisive elements within our society, we would see ordinary citizens voice their unrest.

The start of that unrest was on the weekend. It is also evidenced by the growing anti-halal movement operating in Australia. Dismissing their concerns will only further alienate the electorate who are desperate for someone in parliament to represent them.

The Australian majority are tired of being ignored by those they consider out of touch. Now they are slowly starting to find their voice.

It will make for a very interesting few years in politics.