Under a citizenship cloud

rainbow_defend_freedoms.pngIt is tempting to write about something other than politics this week lest merely talking about the dysfunction of our Federal parliament delivers even greater despondency to our many readers.

There are plenty of personal or non-political things I could muse about…the pain associated with my first pre-season football training (yes I know I am too old but that won’t stop me!), how it feels to be a parent with a son just finished his year 12 exams or even the finer points of fishing.

In fact, almost anything would suffice to ameliorate the frustration attached to the current state of politics.

Let me be clear, this frustration has nothing to do with the marriage survey result last week. The people have spoken and the numbers are there in parliament to redefine marriage. That will happen and the best I can hope to do is to work towards the best possible outcome.

I regret the malaise is due to something much more than a single (although very significant) decision. I cannot help but think the system isn’t working for the Australian people.

The entire parliament is under a citizenship cloud, bringing every decision into question. The executive government is in disarray with perpetual rumblings about another leadership spill.

Meanwhile, the national debt keeps rising and the Australian people become more concerned for their future and that of their children.

The public are not listening to the Prime Minister and have no love for the Leader of the Opposition. A leadership change may solve one matter but would result in different problems. A general election would probably deliver a Shorten-led Labor government which would lead to poorer business conditions, more wasteful spending, higher debt, taxes and living costs - not to mention further erosion of our freedoms.

Who can blame anyone for throwing their hands in the air and simply muttering words to the effect of ‘a pox on both your houses’? Unfortunately that won’t make things any better - in fact, for the sake of the nation, our children and our future, we must find a better way.

I believe Australian Conservatives offers that path. We know what we stand for, we apply principle to our decision making and adopt policies built around our shared values.

That way we might reduce our national debt, block government intrusion in our lives, deliver affordable and reliable energy, raise our educational standards and ease cost of living pressures.

We might see some stability and predictability come back into our political system, with a corresponding rise in confidence from the Australian community. Who knows, we could even see a Prime Minister last an entire electoral term!

So whilst there is every justification for us to be disappointed by the current playbook of Australian politics, we need to have an optimistic view of how that might change. Ultimately, if we are to make that change it will be up to every Australian voter.

The real power for change is within our democratic institutions and ultimately comes down to every one of us.

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